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Michael Gillis

Michael Gillis
701 W. Market Street  Perkasie  PA 18944
Phone:  215-469-0213
Office:  215-453-7653
Fax:  267-354-6911

My Blog

New Challenges in Keeping Kids Safe Online

June 7, 2012 3:28 am

A new survey of Internet use by tweens (10 to 13 year olds) revealed that parents are doing a good job monitoring their children's online behavior, including talking to them and setting guidelines and restrictions for Internet use on home computers. Yet there is room for improvement, especially when it comes to keeping tweens safer when they use mobile and other connected devices.

Parents used to only have to worry about monitoring the home computer to keep their kids safer online. But today, Internet use is doubling every two years, and kids have access to the Internet through mobile devices, such as smartphones, handheld games, game consoles and tablets. The average family uses five Internet-enabled devices at home.

The Tween Internet Safety Survey, commissioned by Cox Communications in partnership with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), found that nearly all tweens (95 percent) use mobile devices to go online.

Mobile devices and gaming consoles are widely used by tweens to access Web content, and the survey revealed a lack of guidelines and controls on these devices that can leave tweens vulnerable. While 68 percent of parents surveyed said they monitored their child's Internet behavior on mobile devices, the survey showed that only 1 in 5 (17 percent) actually use basic parental control features such as age appropriate Web content filtering on smartphones, tablets and game consoles.

Parents and tweens acknowledged that fewer controls exist on mobile devices and gaming consoles than on computers. The survey revealed that many parents are not using the monitoring software and parental control tools available on their tweens' mobile devices because they are not familiar with how they work.
  • 83 percent of tweens use a gaming console to access the Internet at home.
  • 51 percent of the parents in the survey said they monitor their child's Internet behavior on gaming consoles.
  • 65 percent of parents said they were aware of and knew how to use parental controls on mobile devices and gaming consoles with Internet access.
The survey results also showed a gap between what tweens are doing online and what their parents believe they are doing.
  • 82 percent of parents surveyed considered themselves very knowledgeable about what their tween does online, and for the most part, believed their tween practices safe online behavior.
  • However, many of the tweens surveyed admitted to engaging in risky online behavior, including breaking the rules, accessing inappropriate content, and covering their tracks as they go; often unbeknownst to parents.
    • 44 percent admitted they've looked at or watched something online that their parents wouldn't approve of. (Only 28 percent of parents were aware of this.)
    • 34 percent have lied to parents about what they've done online. (Only 18 percent of parents were aware of this.)
Many children are facing risks online without their parents' knowledge.
  • 42 percent have received a personal message from someone they didn't know. (Only 22 percent of parents were aware of this.)
  • 17 percent have received an email or online message with pictures or words that made them feel uncomfortable. (Only 7 percent of parents were aware of this.)
  • 12 percent have already been bullied by someone online. (Only 6 percent of parents were aware of this.)

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Surging Enrollment Outpaces On-Campus Housing Demands

June 7, 2012 3:28 am

A 38.7 percent increase in university enrollment over the past decade is creating a shortage of on-campus housing nationwide, according to a new white paper from the National Multi Housing Council's (NMHC) National Student Housing Council (NSHC). The analysis utilized U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Census Bureau data between 2000 and 2010 to identify on-campus housing needs across the country.

"The tremendous size of Generation Y, combined with economic uncertainty, have pushed enrollment to new heights over the past decade," says Jim Arbury, NMHC's vice president of Student Housing. "This has put tremendous pressure on universities across the country as they attempt to keep up with the demand for on-campus living, offering a new opportunity for student housing firms."

Notable facts from the research report include:
  • The 38.7 percent increase in enrollment led to a 21.4 percent growth in the number of students living off campus.
  • While every state saw enrollment increases, Arizona, District of Columbia, Georgia, Iowa, Minnesota and West Virginia experienced some of the greatest surges in enrollment.
  • Most states have been unable to maintain the same percentage of students housed in dorms. States with the highest on-campus shortages are Arizona, District of Columbia, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Nevada and Oregon.
  • Only five states (California, Florida, Hawaii, Maryland and Utah) have been able to provide enough additional dorm beds to maintain dorm residency levels against growing enrollments.
Source: National Multi Housing Council

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Average 15-Year Fixed-Rate Mortgage Breaks Barrier, Falls to 2.97 Percent

June 7, 2012 3:28 am

Freddie Mac recently released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing fixed mortgage rates following bond yields lower to new all-time record lows. The 30-year fixed averaged 3.75 percent setting a new all-time record low for the fifth consecutive week. The 15-year fixed averaged an unprecedented 2.97 percent bringing three of the four benchmark mortgage rates below 3 percent for the first time in Freddie Mac's weekly survey.

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.75 percent with an average 0.8 point for the week ending May 31, 2012, down from last week when it averaged 3.78 percent. Last year at this time, the 30-year FRM averaged 4.55 percent.

The 15-year FRM last week averaged 2.97 percent with an average 0.7 point, down from last week when it averaged 3.04 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 3.74 percent.

The 5-year Treasury-indexed hybrid adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) averaged 2.84 percent last week, with an average 0.6 point, up from last week when it averaged 2.83. A year ago, the 5-year ARM averaged 3.41 percent. Meanwhile, the 1-year Treasury-indexed ARM averaged 2.75 percent for the week with an average 0.4 point, unchanged from last week. At this time last year, the 1-year ARM averaged 3.13 percent.

According to Frank Nothaft, vice president and chief economist for Freddie Mac, "Market concerns over tensions in the Eurozone led to a decline in long-term Treasury bond yields helping to bring fixed mortgage rates to new record lows last week. Compared to a year ago, rates on 30-year fixed mortgage rates are almost 0.9 percentage points lower, which translates into nearly $1,200 less in annual payments on a $200,000 loan. Meanwhile, the S&P/Case-Shiller 20-city composite home price index (not seasonally adjusted) showed annual home-value gains in March in seven cities and a monthly gain in 12 cities."

Source: Freddie Mac

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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10 Quirky Roadside Attractions to See This Summer

June 6, 2012 3:28 am

The great American road trip is the highlight of many travel bucket lists and this summer is the perfect time for travelers to cross that trip off the list. Jamie Jensen, author of the popular “Road Trip USA” travel guidebook, shares his top 10 roadside attractions for an unforgettable summertime adventure.

1. Cadillac Ranch, Amarillo, Texas
Built in the 1970s, and celebrated in an eponymous 1980s hit by Bruce Springsteen, Cadillac Ranch consists of 11 classic 1950s Cadillacs buried nose-down in the southern Great Plains, right along old Route 66 outside Amarillo, Texas.

2. Wall Drug, Wall, S.D.
Photo opportunities abound at this famous roadside business, founded in 1931, thanks to the 80-foot-long dinosaur, a replica of nearby Mt. Rushmore, a 520-seat cafe, and shops for everything from postcards to cowboy boots.

3. Lucy the Elephant, Margate, N.J.
Immediately south of Atlantic City, there stands a classic remnant of the Jersey Shore's glory days: Lucy the Elephant, a six-story wood-and-tin pachyderm. Built by a Philadelphia real estate speculator in the 1880’s to draw customers to his newly laid-out community, this landmark was used around the turn of the 20th century as a tavern and now holds a small museum of local history.

4. Madonna Inn, San Luis Obispo, Calif.
The town of San Luis Obispo is home to one of California's most noteworthy pop culture landmarks, the Madonna Inn, which offers more than 100 unique rooms, each decorated in a wild barrage of fantasy motifs. There are the bright pink honeymoon suites known as "Just Heaven" and "Love Nest," and an Elvis-worthy "Safari Room" covered in fake zebra skins with a jungle-green shag carpet.

5. Carhenge, Alliance, Neb.
At the edge of Nebraska’s rolling Sand Hills, the small town of Alliance presents you with Carhenge. Built in 1987 as part of a local family reunion, Carhenge is a giant-sized replica of the famous Druid ruin, Stonehenge; this one, however, is built entirely out of three dozen late-model American cars, stacked on top of one another to form a semi-circular temple.

6. Clark's Trading Post, Lincoln, N.H.
For nearly a century the main draw at Clark's Trading Post has been the chance to “See Live Bears!” as they perform a series of entertaining tricks—rolling barrels, shooting basketballs through hoops, and riding scooters. Don’t miss Clark’s gift shop, which is stocked with all the wonderfully tacky stuff retro-minded road-trippers drive miles to find.

7. Collinsville Catsup Bottle, Collinsville, Ill.
Across the Mississippi from St. Louis, the town of Collinsville has become nearly-world-famous for the World's Largest Catsup Bottle, which rises south of Main Street. Constructed in 1949 on the grounds of what used to be the Brooks Catsup Company, this decorated water tower was restored by the people of Collinsville as a super-size symbol of local pride and perseverance.

8. South of the Border, S.C.
Located just south of the North Carolina state line at I-95 exit 1, South of the Border is a 135-acre assembly of sombrero-shaped fast-food stands, giant video arcades, souvenir shops, a sombrero-clad concrete brontosaurus and 20-story Sombrero Tower giving a panoramic view of the Interstate.

9. Paul Bunyan, Bemidji, Minn.
Standing along a lakeshore in the Great North Woods of Minnesota, brightly painted statues of legendary lumberjack Paul Bunyan and his sidekick Babe the Blue Ox have been drawing visitors to the town of Bemidji since 1937. Next to Paul and Babe, the Bemidji visitors center boasts a fireplace made with stones from every U.S. state (apart from Alaska and Hawaii, which weren't states when the fireplace was built), and shares space with a small museum of taxidermied wildlife and odd historical items, including Paul Bunyan's ax.

10. World's Largest Six Pack, La Crosse, Wis.
The Mississippi River town of La Crosse Wisconsin is host to the World's Largest Six-Pack, which stands right along the Great River Road. Used as a fermentation tank for a local brewery, when full, the Six Pack holds enough beer to fill seven million real-life cans.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Mastering the Art of Toss Pillows: 9 Simple Do's and Don'ts

June 6, 2012 3:28 am

Much more than an accent color, decorative pillows have come into their own as one of the least expensive and most cost-effective ways to personalize furniture and change a home's décor. With more open floor plans today—and fewer walls to hang art on—they can also be conversation starters.

"The perfect scarf or bracelet can turn an ordinary outfit into an extraordinary one," says Kris Woodcock, VP of Merchandising, Ashley Furniture HomeStore. "In the same way, the perfect combination of toss pillows can turn an ordinary room into a showstopper."

Many exciting new pillow trends are making their debut, from couture, nubby and boldly-patterned choices, to a bolder mix of pillow styles together. Follow these nine simple do’s and don’ts to mix and match decorative toss pillows to create a look that’s right for you.

1. DON'T use cheap-looking pillows. Nothing ruins a good-looking sofa more than dated or poor quality pillows, while nothing transforms an inexpensive sofa more than high-quality, fashion-forward toss pillows.

2. DO match the mood of your pillows to the mood of your sofa. Choose toss pillows the same way you chose your sofa - based on your lifestyle and tastes. Use dressy pillows with a dressy sofa; casual pillows with a casual sofa.

3. DON'T use pillows that are duller, or a lot lighter than the sofa. There's an exception to every rule, but decorators agree that decorative pillows look best when they're darker, brighter or bolder than the sofa.

4. DO use pillows in a similar style. For an elegant look, stick with satiny or faux-fur fabrics. For a global look, stick with earthy or exotic fabrics. For a modern look, stick with bright or geometric fabrics.

5. DON'T use pillows too big (or too small) for the sofa. Large throw pillows on a small sofa will make it look even smaller. Small pillows (or too few of them) on a large sofa will look dwarfed.

6. DO use toss pillows with related colors. Forget about fancy color theories. Simply choose pillow colors with something in common, such as hues all inspired by a country landscape or a summer fruit salad.

7. DON'T feel compelled to use the pillows that came with your sofa. Factory pillow choices are intended to appeal to as many people as possible rather than to personal tastes. Be different.

8. DO mix patterns and textures. Choose pillows that look like they came from the same place or era, then mix nubby with smooth. To mix patterns, simply repeat the colors in each decorative pillow, while differentiating the pattern's motif or scale.

9. DON'T play it too safe. Be bold with memorable colors or textures.

If you're still defaulting to the pillows that came with the sofa, use this simple formula to mix things up a little: First, make sure each pillow contains at least one color in common with another pillow, then mix together plain pillows with patterned choices and pile pillows for an amazing look.

Source: Ashley Furniture HomeStore

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Laminate Flooring becoming Increasingly Popular among Eco-Friendly Homeowners

June 6, 2012 3:28 am

Going green and being frugal go hand in hand if you choose your home's flooring wisely. Both environmentally friendly and a good value, a laminate floor can transform a room without felling a tree, mining a quarry or depleting your wallet.

Among homeowners in the know, laminate flooring has long been known as an affordable solution. Now, with the green movement catching on with homeowners, laminate has earned a reputation as an inherently green one as well.

Laminate flooring is composed of a hybrid of materials fused together through a unique lamination process. Thanks to the layer of high-definition photography used to give laminate flooring its beauty, laminate creates the realistic look of a natural resource—such as wood, marble or stone—without actually using it, so fewer raw materials are used in the manufacturing process.

"The manufacture of laminate flooring doesn't involve the harvesting of old-growth hardwoods like those found in tropical rainforests," says Bill Dearing, president of the North American Laminate Flooring Association (NALFA). "Laminate provides the desired look, no matter how scarce, without depleting natural resources."

Moreover, textures that replicate saw marks, worm holes and other decorative details give laminate flooring a remarkably realistic look, but not at the expense of Mother Nature. For example, laminate's fiberboard core is typically comprised of at least 74 percent pre-consumer recycled waste, such as sawdust from mills and wood chips from log processing.

"Laminate flooring has a wealth of green advantages, and products certified to NALFA's sustainability standard are being used in growing numbers because of them," Dearing says. "Consumers are becoming increasingly conscious of the importance of environmentally friendly products."

Dearing says the NALFA Certification Seal is confirmation that a laminate floor is manufactured with these earth-friendly qualities:

-It's made with recycled natural resources producing a heavy-duty, high-density core board.
-It's recyclable.
-It's free of air-damaging chemicals. Because laminate is installed without glues and adhesives, and because laminate floors can be cleaned without the use of harsh chemicals, laminate helps to prevent harmful emissions of volatile organic compounds.
-It complies with formaldehyde emissions regulations for laminate flooring core board set forth by the California Air Resources Board.
-It is comprised of recycled content that may contribute points to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards for homes and businesses.
-At the end of a laminate floor's lifetime, it can be reused or recycled. Or, when dismantled, the boards can be put back into the production process, ground for agriculture use, or burned as waste-to-energy. That keeps old flooring from landing in the landfill.
From the materials used in its manufacturing to the frequent reuse of those materials, a NALFA-certified laminate floor's entire lifecycle is environmentally friendly.

"With the green movement gaining ground in the flooring industry and with competitive prices between green and non-green products, more consumers are going with the purchase of green products," Dearing says. "Sometimes it's the tipping point. All things being equal, customers are starting to choose the green product."

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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New Study Looks at What Defines Happiness

June 5, 2012 3:26 am

Most Americans age 35+ are happy, but compared to historical General Social Survey (GSS) data, levels of happiness are on the decline and at their lowest levels (due in part to the economy), according to a new study recently released by AARP. In an effort to find out what happiness means to adults and what it takes to thrive as they age, AARP surveyed more than 4,000 adults age 35+. The study, titled, "Beyond Happiness: Thriving," provides a unique view of today's modern family with a robust understanding of happiness, how it changes over time and how age affects the drivers that enable people to thrive.

"We're always looking to get a more robust understanding of the contributors and barriers to happiness in people's lives," said Steve Cone, Executive Vice President of Integrated Value &Strategy, AARP. "Building on previous AARP research, which shows the importance of happiness and peace of mind to 50+ families, these new results affirm that we are on the right track—advocating to ensure basic health and financial security and making available everyday discounts that let people enjoy time with family and friends."

The results of this study support the finding of a U-shape curve of happiness by age. The early 50s is the lowest point from which happiness builds. Thus, if you missed happiness in your 30's, there is still another chance to achieve it in your 60's. The results also provide four key insights around the drivers of happiness.

Findings:

The Current State of Happiness

Overall, the strong majority (68 percent) of respondents report being happy, although intensity of happiness is somewhat tempered as the largest percent report being somewhat happy (49 percent) versus very happy (19 percent). Almost half of respondents feel they are just as happy as others (49 percent) and the rest tend to believe that they are happier than others (31 percent) as opposed to less happy than others (13 percent). Part of this may be attributed to the perceptions of people being the masters of their own happiness destiny. There is noted concern for the happiness of the next generation. Less than half feel they will be as happy or more (45 percent). Most are either not sure (19 percent) or believe they will be less happy (35 percent).

Relationships are the Key Driver of Happiness
Regardless of age, good relationships with friends, family, and even pets, were found to be universally important. Activities rooted firmly in relationships contributed most to happiness. The most significant were:

- Kissing or hugging someone you love
- Watching your children grandchildren or close relative succeed
- Being told you are a person who can be trusted or relied upon
- Spending time with your family or friends such as a meal or social gathering
- Experiencing a special moment with a child

Relationships with pets were especially important to women, singles and older individuals. However, relationships did have to be real: "connecting with friends or family on a social media site like Facebook" came in 37th out of 38 activities in contributing to happiness. Importantly, none of the top contributors require a lot of money to achieve; they are "simple pleasures" that can be had by all.

Health Perceptions, Rather than Reality, May Enable Happiness
Without health it is difficult to achieve happiness: people in "good or excellent" health are three times more likely to report being "very" happy. Health however, may be more a state of mind than objective reality: the percentage of those reporting good health is relatively stable over the 35-80 age range, varying only seven percentage points, even as reported chronic or serious medical conditions increase 400 percent in the same age range.

People Believe they can Control their Own Happiness
The majority of those surveyed feel they have control over their personal level of happiness. Interestingly, this sense of control increases with age. Moreover, people who feel in control are clearly happier—reporting that they are 2.5 times happier than those who believe happiness is out of their control. A sense of control is linked to higher income, higher education, good health and the lack of having experienced a major life event in the past year.

Money Does Not Guarantee Happiness
Money matters but how one spends it seems to matter more. Happiness increases with income and conversely, lack of financial resources was tied to unhappiness. While less than a third of participants said money contributed to happiness, when asked how they would spend $100 on something to increase happiness, most respondents said they would spend it on their family or going out to dinner. Money is only a resource, that when applied to meaningful areas of one's life, can provide experiences that can increase happiness.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Play It Safe: Tips for Outdoor Adventurers

June 5, 2012 3:26 am

Outdoor adventures have become the latest craze in travel, and with the summer travel season right around the corner, outdoor enthusiasts are getting ready to hit the road. If you’re looking for adventure this summer and plan on taking the family for a hike or two as the temperatures heat up, the following tips from Motel.com will enable you to enjoy the beauty of the natural environment while hitting the trails.

1. First, it is important to eat a good breakfast. Morning meals that include hot cereal or energy bars will provide carbohydrates to help you maintain energy while on the trail. This is especially important for anyone who is concerned about being physically fit enough to participate in an outdoor travel adventure.

2. Second, it is a necessity that you tell friends or family where you are going and when you will be returning. If you are going into a national park, it is important to check in with the park’s rangers and let them know you will be hiking in the area.

3. Third, be aware of the area’s weather. When going on an outdoor travel adventure, weather can be a crucial element to your party’s safety and level of enjoyment. Being prepared to face potentially dangerous weather situations is vital in keeping your family’s outdoor adventures safe and memorable.

Source: Motel.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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When It Comes to Fire Safety, Don't Overlook Outdated Smoke Alarms

June 5, 2012 3:26 am

More than a quarter of U.S. homes built prior to 2002—approximately 17 million—may require updated fire safety equipment, according to a new survey conducted by Qualtrics on behalf of Kidde, a leading manufacturer of residential fire safety products. The survey, launched in conjunction with Home Safety Month in June, found that 20 percent of respondents had never replaced a smoke alarm, and another six percent hadn't replaced alarms in the last decade. Kidde is a part of United Technology Climate, Controls & Security, a unit of United Technologies Corp.

Aging smoke alarms may not operate efficiently and often cause nuisance alarms. A Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center study found that by the time a smoke alarm is 10 years old (the age which the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends replacement), it has a 30 percent chance of not alarming due to age-related factors, such as dust accumulation, insects and airborne contaminants.

"The survey revealed that many people believe smoke alarms should be replaced more often than recommended, however, sales data shows consumers aren't actually doing that," said Chris Rovenstine, vice president, sales and marketing, Kidde. "This disconnect demonstrates a clear need to educate homeowners. What a tragedy it would be to inadvertently risk the lives and well being of a family by failing to ensure alarms are functioning properly due to aging factors."

Additional survey findings include:
-Most families are under protected. Sixty-seven percent of homeowners had four or fewer smoke alarms in their home, and 12 percent of those respondents only had one alarm. The average U.S. single-family home should have at least five alarms.
-The majority of Americans take for granted the constant protection that working smoke alarms provide. Only 17 percent of respondents named smoke alarms as a home appliance that operates 24 hours/day, seven days/week.
-People are more concerned about their electronics than home fire safety. Fifty-two percent are more likely to upgrade or replace a home entertainment-related product (television, game console) than they are to replace their smoke alarms.
-When asked which appliance they would replace if they knew it wasn't functioning properly, very few Americans stated a smoke alarm. Twenty-three percent of respondents said they would replace their home furnace, heater or air conditioning system if they knew it wouldn't work tomorrow, while less than five percent said they would replace their smoke alarm.

The NFPA reports almost two-thirds of residential fire deaths occur in homes without smoke alarms or with non-working alarms and recommends installing smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.

"As we focus on Home Safety Month in June, there is an urgent need to educate families about fire safety," explained Kate Carr, president and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide. "Fire and burns remain a leading cause of unintentional injury and death for children, particularly those under the age of five. Replacing older smoke alarms is a simple way for parents to help protect their families. If you don't know how old your alarms are—even if you have just moved into a home—take precaution and replace them."

When replacing alarms, consider a model containing a long-life sealed lithium battery which offers maintenance-free protection for 10 years and never needs its battery replaced. A combination smoke/CO alarm offers protection from fire and carbon monoxide in one unit.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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7 Tips to Protect Your Home This Summer

June 4, 2012 3:26 am

With the summer season right around the corner, families across the country are getting ready to hit the road for some rest and relaxation. Here are a few tips for making sure your possessions are still there when you get back:

1. Do not post about your vacation online until after you get back. If that takes more discipline than you can muster, at the very least keep your location status off any public social networking pages. Many burglars use these sites to identify "safe" targets.

2. Make your home look lived in. A light on a timer is a great first step. You can even buy a small device called "FakeTV" that simulates the light output of a television, making it look like you are home watching TV each evening.

3. Don't leave obvious signs that the house is unoccupied. Stop the mail and paper, or have a neighbor take it in. Arrange for lawn care as needed, and don't leave notes on the door.

4. Make your home hard to get into. You need good locks. Your hidden outdoor key is probably not as cleverly hidden as you think it is. Get to know your neighbors, and leave the key with them. Let them know you will be gone, and have them keep an eye on your house during your absence. If you have an alarm system, by all means use it. Amazingly, many people forget to set the alarm. Conversely, do not think that an alarm system makes you invulnerable. Burglars can still cause you a great deal of misery in a smash-and-grab robbery, leaving before the police can respond. Park a car in the driveway, but be sure to take out the garage door opener first.

5. Remove obvious temptations. Take a walk around your property and make sure you cannot see any easily pawned valuables through uncovered windows. Are there any ladders left out, or particularly easy or well-concealed access points?

6. Prepare for the worst. If your computer were stolen, what might the consequences be? For most of us, this would be dire indeed. Make sure to back up and password protect. Make a quick run-through around the house with a video recorder, listing off the valuables. This could save a lot of hassle with the insurance company if you need to file a claim.

7. Strike the right balance. Only you can make the trade-off between security measures and the burdens they impose. You may wish to place irreplaceable items in a secure location, such as a fireproof safe. This can include expensive jewelry, family photos, and financial records. Make sure your insurance policy is up-to-date. Also, label your possessions with your name.

The good news is that only two out of a hundred homes will be burglarized in any given year. The bad news is that for those two homes that are burglarized, the effects of the intrusion are often devastating. The average burglary costs $1,750, and an invaluable amount of peace of mind. Take a few simple steps to improve your home's security and ensure that your getaway is that much more relaxing.

Source: www.faketv.com.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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