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Michael Gillis

Michael Gillis
701 W. Market Street  Perkasie  PA 18944
Phone:  215-469-0213
Office:  215-453-7653
Fax:  267-354-6911

My Blog

Are Dads The New Mom?

October 25, 2013 3:24 am

Who wears the pants in the family when it comes to household purchasing decisions – mom or dad?

According to a September 2013 survey by Child's Play Communications, titled Are Dads the New Black, mom remains by far the No. 1 decision maker when buying for home and family. Dads are making inroads, but not to the degree many now assume. And mom's evaluation of dad's contribution often differs dramatically from his own.

Conducted with The NPD group, an independent market research company, the Child's Play survey queried nearly 2,500 moms and dads – approximately 1,250 couples – across the U.S., asking for each one's view of dad's decision-making role in 20 different product categories. The survey looked at where dads were "entirely" responsible for a product category, then "primarily" responsible and lastly, where they "shared responsibility equally" with their spouses.

"Based on our immersion in the world of moms, it seemed that some of the claims about dad's involvement in household purchasing decisions were overstated," said Child's Play Communications president, Stephanie Azzarone. "Our goal in launching the survey was to separate perception from reality."

Some highlights:

• Moms remain the major household purchasing decision maker in about 80 percent of families.

• Moms are responsible for the majority of those decisions--about two thirds. This is notable because it contrasts with the long-held belief that moms are responsible for about 80 percent of household purchasing decisions—an indication that dads are getting more involved.

• Dads continue to dominate decision making in what might be considered traditionally "male" categories. 55.3 percent of moms and 62.2 percent of dads said that dad was entirely responsible for buying decisions related to Home Repair, and 50 percent of moms and 57.0 percent of dads said dad had sole responsibility for Lawn & Garden. Meanwhile, roughly a third or more said dads handle all decision making for Automobiles (38.4 percent of moms, 48.6 percent of dads) and Technology (31.8 percent of moms, 35.1 percent of dads). The percentages remained similar when families were asked what dads were "primarily" vs. "entirely" responsible for.

• Moms, however, dominated purchasing decisions for children's products. In fact, dad's role here was noticeably minimal. Moms said that only 1.1 percent of dads were entirely responsible for buying children's toys and clothes and dads were in close agreement, claiming sole responsibility for 2.2 percent of toy purchases and 1.2 percent of children's clothes.

• The balance improved when families were asked where they shared responsibility equally. The four categories that ranked significantly higher than others among both moms and dads were Home Furnishings (51.0 percent of moms and 46.0 percent of dads said decision making here was shared equally), Family Travel (51.0 percent and 46.6 percent), Family Entertainment (43.2 percent and 43.1 percent) and Appliances (41.4 percent and 36.2 percent).

Source: Child’s Play Communications

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Halloween Can Be Scary, Particularly for Pets

October 24, 2013 3:24 am

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) warns people to keep pets safe this Halloween, a holiday that can be truly frightening—and a little hazardous—for pets.

"While Halloween is a lot of fun for kids, pets can be alarmed by the new activity and strange costumes. Many dogs feel they are the guardians of their homes, and they can feel threatened if a stranger comes into their area," explains Dr. Clark K. Fobian, president of the AVMA. "If your pet is apprehensive in these situations, you need to be sensitive to that and make preparations before Halloween to keep your dog or cat from becoming confused and fleeing your home or perhaps even biting somebody."

The AVMA has produced an informative video posted on the AVMA YouTube channel offering tips on celebrating Halloween safely with pets.
"Nothing will ruin your Halloween fun like an emergency trip to the hospital, or to the animal hospital, because one of your animals got into the candy bowl or got scared enough to scratch or bite," Dr. Fobian says. "Consider putting your pet into a place where it will feel safe. This could be inside a crate with a favorite toy or pet treat or inside a room with the door closed. If you're dog or cat is prone to becoming extremely stressed, work with your local veterinarian to find solutions. It might even be advisable to board an animal to remove them from the situation."

Here are some other tips to help keep your pet happy and healthy this Halloween:

• The cocoa in chocolate can be poisonous to dogs and cats. The darker the chocolate, the more deadly it can be. In addition, small dogs are more likely to be affected by ingesting a small amount of chocolate than larger dogs.

• Chocolate candies aren't the only sweets that are potentially dangerous. Some pets will consume a candy whole, including the candy wrapper, which can cause an intestinal blockage. Also, Xylitol, an artificial sweetener used in many chewing gums and baked goods, has been shown to be poisonous to dogs. In addition, raisins, a common healthy treat for kids on Halloween, can be poisonous to dogs and cats.

• If you fear your pet has ingested candy or any other potentially dangerous foods, contact your veterinarian or your local emergency pet hospital immediately. A quick response could save your pet's life.

• If you want to put a Halloween costume on your pet, make sure that the costume doesn't obstruct the animal's vision, breathing or movement. Also, it may be a good idea to introduce your pet to the costume a few days or weeks before Halloween, so it won't startle them on such a busy, unusual day. Never leave your pet alone while it is wearing a costume.

• Halloween decorations, like candles or jack-o'-lanterns, and pets don't go together. Your pet could knock something over and possibly start a fire or suffer burns. Make sure they're placed where pets can't access them.

• Make sure that every day—but particularly on Halloween—your pet has proper identification. With the front door opening and closing to allow neighborhood children to say "trick or treat," it's possible a pet could panic and run out into the night while you're busy handing out candy. Proper identification, particularly microchip identification with up-to-date registered information, will make it much more likely that you'll be reunited with your pet.

Source: American Veterinary Medical Association

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Boomers Much Less Likely to Shop on Cyber Monday

October 24, 2013 3:24 am

FatWallet.com announced results from its 2013 Cyber Monday Shopping Survey by TNS Global. Of the 1,000 surveyed online, 48 percent said they will shop this Cyber Monday, 60 percent under age 40 and less than 40 percent age 50 or over. More than half of those that plan to shop this Cyber Monday said they will spend more this year (52 percent, up from 33 percent from a year ago), and 44 percent said they would spend more than $200. When it comes to which way they will look to find savings, 78 percent said deals (products on sale), 55 percent store-wide discounts, 76 percent want free shipping and 30 percent will seek cash back. Ways they will shop for Cyber Monday deals:

• 91 percent will use online retailers
• 29 percent will use online coupon sites
• 23 percent will use Emails
• 18 percent will use online cash back sites
• 13 percent will use mobile devices
• 9 percent will use social media

"The majority of younger adults are more digitally connected then Boomers are, using emerging online marketing channels like mobile and social media to shop," states Ryan Washatka, FatWallet president. "Cyber Monday offers the perfect storm for these shoppers and the record spending we've seen the last couple of years supports this."

Items they will be shopping for the most on Cyber Monday:

• 54 percent for holiday gifts
• 34 percent for gadgets
• 34 percent for clothing
• 32 percent for books, movies or music
• 25 percent for toys
• 21 percent for tablets/Smartphones
• 19 percent for laptops
• 16 percent for TVs

When asked what time they will shop for Cyber Monday deals, 33 percent will start on Pre-Cyber Monday (Sunday), 69 percent on Cyber Monday (a.m.) and 19 percent during Cyber Week (Tuesday through Friday following Cyber Monday).

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Tips for Deciding When to Replace a Front Door

October 24, 2013 3:24 am

Homeowners looking to save on rising energy bills can start right at the front door. That's the advice of experts at Therma-Tru Corp. who suggest evaluating your main entry door at least once a year to determine the status of the door's operational capabilities and energy efficiency features.

"Every component of a home needs to be replaced at some point over time," says Derek Fielding, director of product management for Therma-Tru Corp. "Most homeowners can get years of service out of their front door, but there will come a time when a door needs to be replaced. That's why it's important to annually evaluate and maintain your main entryway."

According to Fielding, there are several easy ways homeowners can determine when it's time to consider a front door replacement.

Tip #1 - Open and close your doors on both dry and wet, humid days. Make sure all the components operate smoothly. If your door doesn't close securely, or fits tightly on humid days, then it’s most likely leaking air on dry days, causing the home to lose energy.

Tip #2 - Inspect the weather stripping around all sides of the front door to make sure it has not worn out. On a bright day, stand inside near your door and look for daylight flowing through the door perimeter. If light is coming in, then so most likely, is external air and possibly moisture. That means it’s time to determine if your foam-filled weather stripping may have lost some of its compression, cracked or simply worn out.

Tip #3 - Examine your locks to make sure they operate smoothly and are strong enough to help protect your home. Multi-point locking systems offer exceptional peace-of-mind and security for the home.

Tip #4 - Reach out and touch your door on both hot and cold days. If you feel the exterior temperatures on the inside surface, then your door may not have adequate insulation. In this situation, consider upgrading the door with a replacement that is more energy efficient and has an ENERGY STAR® qualified rating for your geographic area. Order a multi-point locking system on your next door for a tighter fit against the weather stripping, which can help provide even greater energy savings.

Tip #5 - Look at the appearance of your door. If you have a wood door, it may be warping or rotting after years of service. A steel door can get dinged and rust over time. And, it's possible that the style of the door simply doesn't match up with the design of your home. These are all red flags that it's time to replace your front door.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Taxpayers Should Act Now to Take Advantage of IRS Changes

October 23, 2013 3:24 am

Unlike last year, tax planning for 2013 is not hampered by uncertainties over a looming fiscal cliff. Unfortunately, there is always some uncertainty and a few expiring provisions to warrant special attention by taxpayers.

Managing income taxes at year end involves techniques designed to address three issues:

• Accelerating or deferring income: If a taxpayer expects to be in the same or a lower tax bracket next year, it's best to defer as much income as possible until after the year-end.
• Accelerating or deferring deductions: If a taxpayer's overall tax rate is the same in both years, accelerating deductions achieves tax savings this year rather than waiting for those tax savings to materialize next year.
• Take advantage of tax provisions scheduled to expire at the end of 2013: There are several temporary tax provisions that can only be used this year.

Tax planning begins by projecting income and deductions for the year to determine your tax bracket and income thresholds that trigger higher and/or additional taxes, or limits the effectiveness of deductions. One of the impacts of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA12) is the reintroduction of the Pease limitation, which can greatly limit itemized deductions. Once a taxpayer knows what his or her income taxes will look like, it’s time to evaluate which techniques will help the most.

Strategies to accelerate or defer income:
• Adjust your elective deferral plans at work: Taxpayers who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, or in the Thrift Savings Plan can defer up to $17,500 this year. Taxpayers age 50 and older can defer up to $23,000.
• Harvest capital gains or losses: Long-term capital gains are taxed at 0 percent for taxpayers in the 15 percent bracket. Capital losses can be used to offset capital gains and reduce other income up to $3,000.
• Use the IRA: Taxpayers age 59 ½ and older can accelerate IRA distributions in 2013. Contributions may be deductible depending on your income level and whether you’re covered by a retirement plan through work. Taxpayers under age 59½ can convert traditional IRAs to Roth IRAs to accelerate income.
• Health-care assistance: People with health savings accounts – available with some high-deductible health insurance policies -- can save up to $3,250 tax-deferred for an individual and $6,450 for a family. Those who are 55 and older can save an additional $1,000. Flex spending contribution limits are capped at $2,500 this year.

Strategies to accelerate or defer deductions:

• Medical expenses: The Affordable Care Act (ACA) raises the income threshold this year to 10 percent of adjusted gross income for taxpayers under age 65. The threshold remains at 7.5 percent for those 65 and older. Taxpayers may need to prepare or defer medical bills to lump expenses in a single year to get the deduction.
• Gifts to charities: Use a donor advised fund (DAF) to maximize the tax savings from charitable giving. A DAF makes gifting appreciated securities easier. The DAF can be funded in tax years when the deduction will have the most impact. Distribution to charities can be made at any time without tax consideration.
• Qualified Charitable Distribution: This year only, taxpayers age 70½ or older can choose to direct up to $100,000 of their IRA-required minimum distribution to charity. By doing so, the distribution does not show up as taxable income, which can lower taxation of Social Security benefits and help reduce other threshold levels to further minimize taxes.

ATRA12 extended—but did not make permanent—several tax incentives for individuals. Taxpayers should consider whether they can benefit from these incentives this year and plan accordingly. The following provisions are set to expire on Dec. 31 unless extended again:

• State and local sales taxes deduction. Taxpayer can choose between deducting state and local income taxes or the sales taxes they’ve paid through the year.
• Deduction for teacher expenses. Eligible educators can deduct up to $250 of any unreimbursed expenses.
• Deduction of mortgage insurance premiums. Payments of Private Mortgage Insurance premiums can be treated as deductible home mortgage interest in 2013.
• Discharge of principal residence indebtedness. This can be excluded from gross income this year.
• Qualified Charitable Distribution. Taxpayers can make tax-free charitable donations from their required IRA distributions.

2013 is certainly an exciting year for tax planning. Start now in order to minimize your tax bill in April.

Source: Rodgers & Associates

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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One Year after Hurricane Sandy: Data on Home Repair Projects & Installations

October 23, 2013 3:24 am

One year ago, the week of Halloween would be associated with something a bit more frightening, as a storm of epic proportion barreled toward the eastern seaboard. Hurricane Sandy would pummel into New York and New Jersey wreaking havoc and later becoming the second costliest hurricane in United States history.

Porch.com has assembled data to highlight the aftermath's effects on home repairs and insurance payouts a year after Sandy made landfall. With statistics on over 90 million home repair and improvement projects, data was collected on preventative and reactive measures that were enacted after Hurricane Sandy's landfall.

Following the storm, an estimated 651,000 housing units were destroyed or damaged – 340,000 in New Jersey and 305,000 in the greater New York City area - with 22,000 housing units completely uninhabitable.

Insurance claims skyrocketed with 501,447 claims paid out in the greater New York area and 328,946 claims paid out to New Jersey residents. Safety related projects were the most prevalent in the months immediately following Sandy in the New York and New Jersey metro areas with 49.9 percent of home repairs attributed to safety.

Todd Miller of QMA Design+Build LLC confirmed that "A lot of people were concerned about alarm systems – unfortunately the power goes out and the alarm system doesn't function. We have seen a number of people who have requested generators and that sort of thing. The new FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) rules were pretty restrictive about what you can or can't do."

In what can be speculated as a potential fear of theft or looting, residents equipped their homes with emergency devices following the traumatic storm. Porch.com reported an increase of 55.6 percent alarm safety installs and an increase of 27.8 percent smoke detector installs. Following such a devastating event and with roughly 5 million residents without electrical power, Porch.com also studied the decline in home repair projects in the New York/New Jersey metro area between October and December 2012. The biggest declines in Exterior (18.4 percent) and Window repair (20.3 percent) were likely due to the complete devastation caused by the storm and residents anxiously waiting for insurance payouts. Miller said, "Now that FEMA has finalized their maps and certainty as to the direction that things are going in, we are seeing projects popping up now. If you didn't call your insurance company immediately after the storm, people were waiting months for adjusters."

As applications came rolling in for aid and assistance in home repair and recovery, $5.6 billion in aid was paid out to New Jersey storm victims with $415 million coming from FEMA grants designated to individuals with households. FEMA approved over $1 billion to New York City residents whose property was destroyed or damaged by Sandy with $855 million designated to help survivors with home repairs and temporary rental costs.

New governmental requirements have strengthened protection for residents and insurance providers. Flood maps have been updated for the first time since 1983 with 398,000 residents currently living in flood prone areas in the New York City area. By 2030, all buildings in New York with more than 7 stories and over 300,000 square feet are required to undertake flood protection measures. With New York City being the number one metropolitan city in the U.S. at risk from storm surge, the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force launched "Rebuild By Design" to develop actionable projects that will make the Sandy-affected region more resilient.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Painting a Nursery? Tips, Trends and Ideas for Creating the Perfect Room

October 23, 2013 3:24 am

One of the most exciting design and decorating experiences a couple can have is preparing a room for a newborn. There is a wealth of great ideas and inspiration for designing and painting a nursery - for both DIYs and those hiring a professional painting contractor.

The first step is to decide if the nursery will have a theme or simply a mix of colors and details you like, points out Sara McLean, a color expert from a paint manufacturer. "Some current trends in nurseries include modern baby chic, vintage nostalgia, Bohemian, school themes such as science and tech, and fun twists on nature including beach and woodland themes," she says. "Or even opting for a traditional theme, like nautical, carousel or cowboy, you can add your own sense of playfulness, creativity or whimsy."

The color palette is the next step, thinking beyond just pink or blue. McLean says that the tradition of using blue in a boy's nursery has evolved into combinations of blue - particularly turquoise - with other colors such as red, green and orange. Pink for girls has evolved into fuchsia tones with elements of aquamarine, lilac, white and orange. In fact, aqua and orange have become popular choices for both boys and girls. There is a new boldness in the way colors are combined in the nursery - pink and purple with green or blue and yellow with green, for example. Striped ceilings can help stimulate the room and a touch or slight accent of black is trendy right now, to add a little sophistication.

Today's baby rooms include bold and brightly colored carpets, wall decals, maps, figurines and "monster dolls" that are so ugly, they're cute; owls and other woodland critters; and elephants. "Be sure to keep an open mind and eye out for items and styles that can make your nursery unique," adds McLean.

When decorating a nursery, it's important to use non-toxic products - from the paint to the rugs, to the furniture. Opt for biodegradable timber and certified formaldehyde-free furniture, and take special care with any antique baby furniture.

Source: www.dunnedwards.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Tips to Help Homeowners and Buyers Avoid Appraisal Problems

October 21, 2013 3:18 am

The Appraisal Institute recently released some helpful tips for consumers, providing guidance for homeowners and buyers seeking to ensure their sales are completed in a timely manner.

As one of the nation’s largest professional associations of real estate appraisers, the Appraisal Institute created these helpful tips to let consumers know how to protect themselves and how to avoid unnecessary frustration when selling or buying a home.

“Too many consumers in this struggling real estate market face problems with appraisals when attempting to buy or sell a home,” said Appraisal Institute President Joseph C. Magdziarz, MAI, SRA. “But rather than passively endure delays in closing a sale, homeowners and buyers can take proactive steps to avoid pitfalls.”

The Appraisal Institute’s tips encourage homeowners and buyers to:

- Understand the role of appraisals.
- Make sure their lender hires a qualified appraiser (such as a designated SRA, SRPA or MAI member of the Appraisal Institute).
- Accompany the appraiser during the inspection of the property if possible.
- Request a copy of the appraisal report from the lender.
- Examine the appraisal report and ask questions.
- Appeal the appraisal if appropriate.
- Ask the lender to order a second appraisal by a qualified and designated appraiser.
- File legitimate complaints with appropriate state board or professional appraisal organizations.

“Credible opinions of value can help to stabilize the real estate market,” Magdziarz said. “Appraisals are especially important because they are an objective and unbiased source of information. Unlike others involved in real estate transactions, the appraiser is an independent professional who performs a service for a fee rather than for a commission.”

Magdziarz noted that normal declines in the real estate market have led to increased caution by lenders. That caution has led to delays in completing some real estate transactions.

“Appraisers today are doing the same thorough, fact-based research and analysis they have always done,” Magdziarz said. “Nothing has changed in that regard.”

Magdziarz added that appraisers have been wrongly accused of prolonging the nation’s real estate downturn by developing value opinions that are below proposed sale prices. Specifically, he said, they’ve been unfairly criticized for including comparable sales in the valuation process that provide opinions that are below the cost to build.

It serves neither the lender nor the consumer to enter into an upside-down mortgage, he noted. Some real estate agents, mortgage brokers and home builders have used the Home Valuation Code of Conduct and Interagency Appraisal and Evaluation Guidelines as a scapegoat for current declines in the real estate market caused by the weak economy and the general oversupply of homes in the market, Magdziarz said.

For more information, visit www.appraisalinstitute.org.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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The Ripple Effect of Home Buying

October 21, 2013 3:18 am

Using the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), NAHB Economics research shows that a home purchase triggers additional spending on appliances, furnishings, and remodeling. Such spending typically exceeds that of non-moving homeowners and persists for two years after moving.

The NAHB analysis compares spending behavior among three groups of single-family detached homeowners: buyers of new homes, buyers of existing homes and non-moving owners. During the first two years after closing on the house, homebuyers tend to spend on appliances, furnishings and property alterations considerably more compared to non-moving owners. However, homebuyers tend to be larger households with children, and on average wealthier, with higher levels of education and concentrated in urban areas. Any of these factors could potentially explain higher spending on appliances, furnishings and remodeling by home buyers. Thus, the NAHB analysis controls for the impact of household characteristics on expenditures, and, nevertheless, finds that a home purchase alters the spending behavior of homeowners and that otherwise similar homeowners spend more across all three categories compared to non-moving owners during the first two years after moving.

Looking at spending patterns of new homebuyers and identical households that do not move, the differences are largest on furnishings. A typical new homebuyer that buys a new home is estimated to spend in excess of $3,000 more on furnishings than an identical household that stays put in a house they already own. The elevated level of spending persists into the second year as new home buyers spend additional $2,000 over their typical budget on furnishings.

Similarly, moving into a new home triggers higher levels of spending on appliances. A typical new homebuyer that moves into a new home is estimated to spend $1,005 more on appliances during the first year compared to a non-moving owner. The difference shrinks to $348 during the second year and goes away after that.

In the case of property repairs and alterations the differences are smallest, $740, and last only one year, which is not surprising considering that most households would not want to spend years in a house with ongoing remodeling projects.

Buying an older home also triggers additional spending. The typical buyer of an existing home tends to spend close to $4,000 more on remodeling, furnishings, and appliances compared to otherwise identical homeowners that do not move. However, in case of buying an older home, most of this extra spending goes to remodeling projects, more than $2,000, and occurs during the first year after closing on the house. Only the additional spending on furnishings tends to persist beyond the first year.

The statistical analysis further shows that this higher level of spending on furnishings, appliances and property alterations is not paid by cutting spending on other items, such as entertainment, transportations, travel, food at home, restaurants meals, etc. This confirms that home buying indeed generates a wave of additional spending and activity not accounted for in the purchase price of the home alone.

In summary, the NAHB analysis shows that during the first two years after closing on the house, a typical buyer of a new single-family detached home tends to spend on average $7,400 more than a similar homeowner who does not move, including $4,900 in the first year after purchase. Likewise, a buyer of an existing single-family detached home tends to spend about $4,000 more than a similar non-moving home owner, including $3,600 during the first year. The overall ripple effect of home buying does not stop here, as producers of appliances, furnishings and remodelers spend their additional income paid by homebuyers and trigger further waves of economic activity.

Source: NAHB’s Eye on Housing Blog, http://eyeonhousing.wordpress.com/2013/10/09/the-ripple-effect-of-home-buying/

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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Four Handy Tools to Ease Your Autumn Clean-Ups

October 21, 2013 3:18 am

With autumn approaching, I have begun rummaging around the basement for gear that will be required to take care of the annual pre-winter property cleanup. While poking around on the web later, a few new fall cleanup tools popped up that looked pretty interesting.

The right knife. Gardeners.com started off with something very simple, but apparently with high utility. They recommend anyone heading out for yardwork carry the Hori Hori Knife (available everywhere - around $25).

It can be used to cut back perennial foliage, plant bulbs, divide plants, cut open bags, pop dandelions out of the ground, set out transplants, cut twine, even pry the lid off a paint can. The sharp, serrated steel blade easily divides plants, severs weed roots and cuts through twine and packaging.

It's sharp enough to cut back perennials during fall cleanup, according to its makers. Just grab the tops in one hand and slice off the dying foliage near the ground with the knife.

WORX Electric Leaf Shredder. If you're raking up mountains of fall foliage, you can reduce them to a manageable size with an electric leaf shredder, and do good things for your landscape and the planet. Instead of bagging the leaves and having them hauled away, shred them and use them! This shredder can reduce 11 bags of leaves into just one. (available everywhere - around $125)

GreenWorks Electric Chipper. For heavier chopping jobs, the electric chipper fills the bill. The Electric Chipper chops twigs and branches up to 1-3/8" in diameter. It's quieter and cleaner than gas-powered chippers, but effectively turns hedge trimmings, storm and pruning debris into landscape mulch. Just plug it in, put on your safety glasses, press start and you're ready to go. (available at dozens of DIY and gardening sites and stores - around $150).

The WORX JawSaw.
This electric chainsaw is concealed within the jaw-like housing, allowing an operator to safely and easily cut branches up to 4" thick. Between cuts, the blade retracts back into the housing. Steel teeth hold branches in place while cutting. Cut fallen branches where they lay, without lifting.

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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